Trout Zone Anglers

Great Smoky Mountains Fly Fishing Guide

An experienced Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide will get you catching trout in a hurry! Both experienced anglers and novices alike will benefit from a day of fly fishing with the guides at Trout Zone Anglers. Our passion is sharing our love of fly fishing for wild trout with Park visitors. Regardless of your skill level, we are certain that a day spent with one of our guides will make you a better angler and help you start catching more trout in the Great Smoky Mountains.

The Waters You’ll Fish With Your Great Smoky Mountains Fly Fishing Guide

We cover the entire Park, but specialize in fishing on the Tennessee side of the Park. The most famous of these streams is probably Little River. We also fish Abrams Creek, the West Prong of the Little Pigeon, the Middle Prong of the Little Pigeon, Cosby Creek, and Big Creek. Our favorite brook trout streams are often small tributaries of those larger stream systems. On the North Carolina side of the Park, we also fish all of the streams. However, the majority of our time is spent on the Oconaluftee River and its tributaries for our guide trips. If you are interested in guided trips on other streams, feel free to contact me for more information.

Little River fall colors above Elkmont. A Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide usually knows where the best fishing and scenery will be.

“Fall in the Little River Backcountry” © 2015 David Knapp Photography

The Park has over 800 miles of fishable water. If an easy day of fishing close to the car is what you want, we will probably fish on Little River or the Middle Prong. If you are willing to walk, some of our favorite places are well into the backcountry. There is even a good spring creek here in the Smokies. A good Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide will know these streams and know how to find trout. We consider these streams our home waters and spend more time here than anywhere else. This is where we learned to fly fish and is our favorite place to guide.

The Trout You’ll Catch With Your Great Smoky Mountains Fly Fishing Guide

In the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, there are three species of fish that we regularly target. There are wild rainbow and brown trout in abundance. The rainbows average 5-9 inches or so in length. A large wild rainbow trout in the Park might stretch the tape to 14 or 15 inches. Rainbow trout are greatly appreciated by any Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide because they provide good consistent action. That said, the wild brown trout might be our favorite target. These fish average a little larger than the rainbows at 6-12 inches. Occasional trophy sized fish can approach 30 inches and fish over 20 inches are just common enough to encounter a handful each season.

Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide David Knapp with a big brown trout on Little River

“Trout Zone Anglers owner and head guide with a trophy brown trout in the Smokies!” ©2017 Leah Shulley

If browns are our favorite trout, then southern strain brook trout are our favorite char. Not technically a true trout, brook trout are the only native salmonid in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Thus, they have a special place in the ecosystem and the hearts of many visiting Park anglers. A trip to the Smokies to catch these special fish should be on every angler’s bucket list. Fishing for these gems is best on backcountry trips that require a hike before starting to fish.

A Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide can help you find brook trout such as this.

“Smoky Mountain brook trout” ©2017 David Knapp Photography

Why Hire a Great Smoky Mountains Fly Fishing Guide?

Anglers who try to figure out fishing in the Park on their own usually go through a lot of frustration and fishless days. A Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide will help shorten the learning curve. With guides covering a large portion of the Park, we offer professionally guided trips and any necessary gear to help you get out on the water and catching fish. Anglers of all ability levels will benefit from a day on the water with one of our guides.

Trophy brown trout from Little River caught while fishing Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide David Knapp

Steve found a trophy on his first day of fly fishing with Great Smoky Mountains fly fishing guide David Knapp. ©2015 David Knapp Photography

One of the things that many visiting anglers struggle with are the subtle hits when nymphing. Having a guide there to tell you where to cast and especially when to set will help your catch rate improve drastically. Many anglers also struggle with reading the water. As guides who focus on teaching, we will help you understand why the fish are where they are. Every moment is a learning opportunity. We believe that a day spent with a guide should help you become a better angler. Our number one objective is to help you accomplish this goal while having a good time in a relaxing environment.

Booking Your Great Smoky Mountains Fly Fishing Guide

If you would like to book a trip, please contact me for availability. We recommend booking a minimum of one month in advance, and even then you might have a hard time getting a day during peak season. For more information on guided fly fishing trips with Trout Zone Anglers, check out our guided fly fishing page or the rates page.

Information For Your Great Smoky Mountains Fly Fishing Guide

Clear communication up front will help you have the best possible day of guided fly fishing. Providing us with information up front will help us plan the perfect guided fly fishing trip for you. If you want to know what to bring with you on your guided trip, then read this page. One of the most important things you can bring is all of the questions you always wanted answered.

Be honest with your guide about your skill level. Also, we will need to know if you have any dietary restrictions if you are taking a full day trip. Tell us if you need to use our wading gear and other equipment. If you plan on renting our wading gear, we will need to have your approximate sizing information ahead of time. This will help us make sure that we have something that will fit. Shoe size and approximate height and weight will help, or you can consult the wader sizing chart here and let us know what you think your size is.